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Priestdaddy: A Memoir

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    Available in PDF - DJVU Format | Priestdaddy: A Memoir.pdf | Language: ENGLISH
    Patricia Lockwood(Author)

    Book details


'Glorious'Sunday Times
'Laugh-out-loud funny'The Times
'Extraordinary'Observer
'Exceptional'Telegraph
'Electric'New York Times
'Snort-out-loud'Financial Times
'Dazzling'Guardian
'Do yourself a favour and read this memoir!'BookPage

The childhood of Patricia Lockwood, the poet dubbed' The Smutty-Metaphor Queen of Lawrence, Kansas' by The New York Times,was unusual in many respects. There was the location: an impoverished,nuclear waste-riddled area of the American Midwest. There was hermother, a woman who speaks almost entirely in strange riddles andwarnings of impending danger. Above all, there was her gun-toting,guitar-riffing, frequently semi-naked father, who underwent a religiousconversion on a submarine and found a loophole which saw him approvedfor the Catholic priesthood by the future Pope Benedict XVI, despitealready having a wife and children.

When an unexpected crisisforces Lockwood and her husband to move back into her parents' rectory,she must learn to live again with the family's simmering madness, and toreckon with the dark side of her religious upbringing. Pivoting fromthe raunchy to the sublime, from the comic to the serious, Priestdaddyis an unforgettable story of how we balance tradition against hard-wonidentity - and of how, having journeyed in the underworld, we can emergewith our levity and our sense of justice intact.

'Destined to be a classic . . . this year's must-read memoir'Mary Karr, author of The Liars' Club

'Irrepressible . . . joyous, funny and filthy . . . Lockwood blows the roof off every paragraph'Joe Dunthorne, author of Submarine

'Beautiful, funny and poignant. I wish I'd written this book'Jenny Lawson, author of Furiously Happy

'Arevelatory debut . . . Lockwood's prose is nothing short of ecstatic . .. her portrait of her epically eccentric family is funny, warm, andstuffed to bursting with emotional insight'Joss Whedon

'Praise God, this is why books were invented'Emily Berry, author of Dear Boy and Stranger, Baby

Extraordinary ... [Lockwood] weaves together past and present in prose that sizzles and sings ... At times, it feels as if you are eating a pudding stuffed with fruit, chocolate, nuts and a hefty dashy of a strong liqueur ... the book is glorious. It crackles with energy and life. It's funny, it's hectic, and it will sometimes trip you up with a sudden sense of anger and pain (Christina Patterson Sunday Times)Funny and anarchic ... Priestdaddy is a piece of autobiographical writing like no other ... Father Lockwood is a character you couldn't make up, however poetic your imagination. Obsessed with ships and sizzlin' food, he is a gun-toting Southerner who loves thrashing out heavy rock riffs on his electric guitar while wearing only the tiniest pair of underpants ... Simple childhood moments such as learning to swim are bathed in a glorious light that radiates safety and good humour ... The awful things (things that other priests do; grief; the events that led to 'Rape Joke') are given impressionistic treatment, because this is not a misery memoir. Which is not to say she won't weigh in on the Catholic church's subjugation of women, and the thuggish pro-lifery of her upbringing ... She shoots straight when describing classic Southern machismo ... Lockwood's contribution to the hottest oeuvre of the 21st century [memoir] is delightfully amateurish: chaotic, unstructured and laugh-out-loud funny, with not a trace of a creative writing MA. This naughty, innocent, truthful writer is definitely one to watch (Melissa Katsoulis The Times)An extraordinary memoir (Kate Kellaway Observer)Patricia Lockwood['s ...] memoir of growing up a priest's daughter in Kansas City gives a rare and nuanced glimpse of life behind the presbytery doors ... Lockwood has a sharp eye for detail and a way with words when conveying it ... But this memoir isn't just about making readers laugh. She also uses her privileged vantage point to get under the skin of contemporary Catholicism ... unflinching as it is, Lockwood has produced from her peculiar childhood something that is exceptional - exquisitely written, funny, disturbing and freighted with insight, lightly worn. Father Greg should be proud (Peter Stanford Telegraph)Lockwood's prose is cute and dirty and innocent and experienced, Betty Boop in a pas de deux with David Sedaris ... [Priestdaddy] roars from the gate ... electric (Dwight Garner The New York Times)

3.4 (2979)
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Book details

  • PDF | 352 pages
  • Patricia Lockwood(Author)
  • Allen Lane (2 May 2017)
  • English
  • 6
  • Society, Politics & Philosophy

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Review Text

  • By Sabina on 30 July 2017

    The metaphors are arresting and it soon becomes evident that Patricia Lockwood has an original voice and I think, likes to surprise. The back and forth story of her eccentric family and her return to the nest with her husband of ten years, brings together some wacky episodes, some serious (or hilarious) expose of a religious upbringing, some perceptive character portraits of her family and the social networks around them. I think about two thirds through the book I began to wonder whether the unconventional air and particular writing style was going to be too much of a'character' in itself, but I warmed again to the funny, insightful narrative and the very entertaining vignettes of her own young marriage, not just that of her possibly unusual parents.

  • By Orla Houlihan on 2 July 2017

    Priestdaddy is like if you put A Confederacy of Dunces and Ryder into a blender, poured a fifth of vodka in, dumped the mix into a aluminium stockpot, set it ablaze, then cooked a whole ham in the ashes while shredding on a former Beatle's guitar.It's rollicking, hilarious, thoughtful, sometimes heart-breaking, often sublime, and always full of heart.I was raised Catholic and now exist in a state of perpetual bafflement, so this book sang to me (way more than something like The Tao of Pooh ever could).

  • By William Jordan on 9 June 2017

    Patricia Lockwood is certainly onto an excellent subject here: a 9 month stay that she and her husband make with her parents, following an expensive and unusual eye operation her husband has required which has used up their resources and has been part crowd-funded through the author's twitter contacts. Her father is a Catholic priest (originally not religious, then converting to Lutheranism following a tour on a submarine which has seen him watch The Exorcist it would seem times without number, and who can keep his wife and family as they already exist). He is also a man who feels uncomfortable in clothes other than boxer shorts when not wearing his vestments and whose main pleasure in life is playing the electric guitar (basic ass rock, the author tells the seminarian living with them, having been tempted to say it's 'priest core'). Her mother is always on the look out for health problems in the world, but is also kind of indomitable and full of love for her children.This is by turns amusing - very amusing as in her story of a childhood hunting trip - and moving, as in her account of the health problems in the neighbourhood of one of the churches in which her father has served (and which have affected her and her family), and other serious problems she has had in life (such as an attempted suicide attempt and a rape) and that have occurred in the community (sexual exploitation of young people by the clergy and others, which is largely tolerated).So strongly recommended to others.


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