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The King's City: London under Charles II: A city that transformed a nation - and created modern Britain

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    Available in PDF - DJVU Format | The King's City: London under Charles II: A city that transformed a nation - and created modern Britain.pdf | Language: ENGLISH
    Don Jordan(Author)

    Book details


'The cruelty and magnificence of Restoration London provides endless fascination . . . there's much to delight in this volume' The Times

'Don Jordan's history captures the shifts [Charles II] engineered in trade and culture' Nature

During the reign of Charles II, London was a city in flux. After years of civil war and political turmoil, England's capital became the centre for major advances in the sciences, the theatre, architecture, trade and ship-building that paved the way for the creation of the British Empire.

At the heart of this activity was the King, whose return to power from exile in 1660 lit the fuse for an explosion in activity in all spheres of city life. London flourished, its wealth, vibrancy and success due to many figures famous today including Christopher Wren, Samuel Pepys and John Dryden - and others whom history has overlooked until now.

Throughout the quarter-century Charles was on the throne, London suffered several serious reverses: the plague in 1665 and the Great Fire in 1666, and severe defeat in the Second Anglo-Dutch War, which brought about notable economic decline. But thanks to the genius and resilience of the people of London, and the occasionally wavering stewardship of the King, the city rose from the ashes to become the economic capital of Europe.

The King's City tells the gripping story of a city that defined a nation and birthed modern Britain - and how the vision of great individuals helped to build the richly diverse place we know today.

The cruelty and magnificence of Restoration London provides endless fascination . . . there's much to delight in this volume. (The Times)Don Jordan's history captures the shifts [Charles II] engineered in trade and culture. (Nature) --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Book details

  • PDF | 416 pages
  • Don Jordan(Author)
  • Abacus (10 Aug. 2018)
  • English
  • 2
  • Biography

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Review Text

  • By Guest on 23 July 2017

    A wonderfully fresh, invigorating, no nonsense account of a very important passage in British history.

  • By Kindle Customer on 30 July 2017

    I found The King's City a revealing journey into a time and place in which modern Britain was being forged. The book is a reminder of the skulduggery that lay behind Britain becoming Great. It has an entertaining array of scoundrels and a few heroes. In fact, the book is based around characters, with some, like Christopher Wren, all too well known, while others, such as the blackguardly seafarer Sir Robert Holmes, are restored to the prominence they deserve. I found the book particularly interesting in its new material on the collusion between the Royal Family and the London merchants involved in increasing the slave trade to an industrial scale - something I've found ignored by many historians. The book is also good on the tensions between the King and the City, as well as having lighter sections discussing the characters behind the evolution of the modern theatre, particularly the female spy and playwright Aphra Behn, and the squabbling between the luminaries who launched the Royal Society. I even found the section dealing with the plague of 1665 had something new to say regarding the state of medical practice in the seventeenth century, revealing a new hero - at least to me - in the physician, Nathaniel Hodges, who, at great personal risk, set out to prove that traditional remedies were largely useless, and even a con. Recommended.


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