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Exit Music (A Rebus Novel)

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    Available in PDF - DJVU Format | Exit Music (A Rebus Novel).pdf | Language: ENGLISH
    Ian Rankin(Author)

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It's late autumn in Edinburgh and late autumn in the career of Detective Inspector John Rebus. As he tries to tie up some loose ends before retirement, a murder case intrudes. A dissident Russian poet has been found dead in what looks like a mugging gone wrong. By apparent coincidence a high-level delegation of Russian businessmen is in town, keen to bring business to Scotland. The politicians and bankers who run Edinburgh are determined that the case should be closed quickly and clinically.

But the further they dig, the more Rebus and his colleague DS Siobhan Clarke become convinced that they are dealing with something more than a random attack - especially after a particularly nasty second killing. Meantime, a brutal and premeditated assault on local gangster 'Big Ger' Cafferty sees Rebus in the frame. Has the Inspector taken a step too far in tying up those loose ends? Only a few days shy of the end to his long, inglorious career, will Rebus even make it that far?

Rankin has an unparalleled ability to draw in the reader and make us feel every knock and setback in Inspector Rebus's red-raw life. Rarely has that talent been better displayed than in Exit Music which sees the flawed but redeemingly honest central character staggering towards the finishing line of an inglorious career that has utterly defined his life (SCOTLAND ON SUNDAY)the main theme of the book is civic corruption by the power of money, money from whatever source. Always up to the minute, Rankin has Russian oligarchs or something similar lurking on the streets of Edinburgh and the murder of a Russian poet is directly counterpointed to the death throes of the real life Russian, Litvinenko... As Rankin percipiently observes, the problem is the overworld not the underworld - words which might well sum up the philosophy of Rankin's whole ouevre (THE SPECTATOR - Antonia Fraser)The last scene bringing together Rebus and Cafferty, is a sly, ingenious reworking of Holmes's apparently fatal tussle with Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls - another Scottish author attempting to retire his detective but failing, you can't help but notice. The possibility of Rebus returning is conspicuously left open (SUNDAY TIMES - John Dugdale)The title Exit Music serves a dual meaning - not just Rebus's exit from the police but also the possibility of Scotland's wishing to leave the Union with England after the recent election results...Exit Music is a fitting end to the career of one of the most beguiling characters in the history of crime fiction - not because the lowering of the final curtain finds the audience satisfied but because it leaves them gasping for more (THE TIMES - Marcel Berlins)It would, of course, be criminally bad form to reveal the precise manner of John Rebus's final exit - but I think most readers will find the music more or less note-perfect (DAILY MAIL - Mark Billingham)Throughout the entire series, Rankin's strength has been his ability to get under the skin of Edinburgh's pyschogeography: he vividly describes 'a city...of banking and brothels, virtue and vitriol' where underworld meets overworld. Deftly plotted and awash with sarky one-liners Exit Music is no exception (METRO)Rankin's understanding of the man in the street gives special weight to the thread of nationalism which recurs throughout the book. It is exactly because Rebus is non-political - his complaints about the cost of the Parliament Building in Exit Music are as unreflective and herd-minded as the average cab driver - that his acceptance of the inevitability of independence carries such conviction (GLASGOW HERALD)This may be Rebus's swansong but every page crackles with energy. Ian's skill and pawky wit make even the most routine interview a pleasure to read...After 20 years and 17 novels, the old bastard will be missed. Rebus, that is. Rankin will no doubt go on to even greater things (DAILY MAIL - Mark Sanderson)'a classic Rankin' (Five Star Review) (DAILY MIRROR)An elegiac tone pervade Exit Music, a timely wistfulness designed to put you off your guard. Hard to say much else without giving the game away - just brace yourself for a stoater of a cliffhanger ending (SUNDAY TELEGRAPH)Rebus's final case - a satisfyingly enjoyable farewell (SUNDAY TIMES)Whatever he writes, it will be worth reading. For the retirement Rebus, there will not have been bookshops opening at midnight and lines of excited readers dressed as over-weight, near-alcoholic, smoking Scottish cops but such fuss would have been justified. What his Edinburgh neighbour achieved in children's fantasy - redefining the genre and changing publishing expectations - Rankin has achieved in detective fiction (THE GUARDIAN - Mark Lawson)'The first thing to say is that in the Rebus novels Rankin has not only produced the most sustained body of fiction devoted to modern Edinburgh, but has made it once again a city of the mind as Dickens made London and Chandler Los Angeles. He has changed the way people imagine the city. (THE SCOTSMAN - Allan Massie)The detection in these fascinating books has always been secondary to the relationships between detectives and the portrait of Edinburgh...Perhaps our hero should stand for the Scottish Parliament (LITERARY REVIEW - Jessica Mann)After 20 years together, both Rebus and Rankin are at the height of their respective powers, and this web of intrigue is as good as detective drama gets (GLASGOW EVE TIMES)I can't for a moment believe this will be the last Rebus novel, but it's definitely the end of a very long chapter (OBSERVER - Peter Gutteridge)The uncertain postcolonial politics of present-day Scotland is cynically woven together with the dodgy business dealings of new Russian billionaires and old Scots gangsters. Rankin's Edinburgh is, as always, a completely convincing stage for high-flying wheeler dealing as well as low-life veniality (TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT)Factor in the involvement of shady Russian oligarchs; thehead honchos of Scotland's national bank; a couple of ruthless MSPs; and Rebus's nemesis, local gangster Big Ger Cafferty, and you have the makings of a ripely entertaining tale (TIME OUT)Sharply written, thoroughly gripping, seventeen books and Rankin's still on top form (DAILY SPORT)How much do we have to bribe Rankin to bring this one (Rebus) back? (DAILY RECORD)I believe he (Rebus) will return in some form or other. He is too successful a character to stay off the bestseller lists for long (IRISH TIMES)'Utterly compelling (REVIEWING THE EVIDENCE .COM)the eighteenth in Ian Rankin's wonderful series about the hard-drinking, Seventies-music-loving, authority-hating Edinburgh detective (THE TABLET)Rankin cleverly brings his famous character's career to a close (CHOICE)Rankin is on top form in this one (INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY)Ian Rankin whose last Rebus book is as fine example of its form as you could hope for (SCOTLAND ON SUNDAY - Stuart Kelly)Exit Music is up to Rankin's usual standard and it'll be a pity if it is his swansong (IRISH EXAMINER - Vincent Banville)I enjoyed the retirement party Ian Rankin threw for his gloomy Inspector Rebus in Exit Music. After 17 books - this last a swirl of Tartan gangsters and dead Russian dissidents - the old warhorse was long overdue a nice sit-down and a stiff drink (DAILY TELEGRAPH - Sam Leith)The 'last' Rebus is one of the best (THE SCOTSMAN - Allan Massie)No prizes for guessing the crime fiction event of the year. What with a final showdown with his long-time nemisis Big Ger Cafferty, this is a fitting send off for Rebus, and quite right too. He's the reason for the phenomenal success of this series, the kind of loveable rogue who's not above picking up a few signed copies of a victim's last book to punt on e-bay. Pure class (METRO)"The gritty Scots narration intensifies the dramatic darkness and contemporary punch of Rankin's writing." (Rachel Redford THE OBSERVER)"Rankin once again proves himself to be the master of British crime writing, and James Macpherson¿s gritty reading brings the characters to life." (DAILY EXPRESS)"Rankin has given us Rebus' last case in "Exit Music", impeccably read by James MacPherson. As many twists as barley sugar and considerably less sweet." (INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY)'With no let-up in the pressure inside Rebus's head, MacPherson gives us the best performance yet and proves that one reader does not mean one monologue - each character is given their own voice which makes this dramatic. It's a rollicking good listen.' (THE GUARDIAN 40 BEST AUDIOBOOKS)Glaswegian James Macpherson's reading of Ian Rankin's Edinburgh-set Rebus novels make enthralling listening. (Christina Hardyment THE TIMES)"Faultless writing, faultlessly read... Sheer aural pleasure. An audiobook masterpiece." (AUDIOBOOKSREVIEW.CO.UK)"James Macpherson masterfully conjures up the various characters in this final outing for Rebus, and his accent creates just the right atmosphere." (THE GOOD BOOK GUIDE)The last scene bringing together Rebus and Cafferty, is a sly, ingenious reworking of Holmes's apparently fatal tussle with Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls - another Scottish author attempting to retire his detective but failing, you can't help but notice. The possibility of Rebus returning is conspicuously left open (John Dugdale SUNDAY TIMES)The title Exit Music serves a dual meaning - not just Rebus's exit from the police but also the possibility of Scotland's wishing to leave the Union with England after the recent election results...Exit Music is a fitting end to the career of one of the most beguiling characters in the history of crime fiction - not because the lowering of the final curtain finds the audience satisfied but because it leaves them gasping for more (Marcel Berlins THE TIMES)It would, of course, be criminally bad form to reveal the precise manner of John Rebus's final exit - but I think most readers will find the music more or less note-perfect (Mark Billingham DAILY MAIL)This may be Rebus's swansong but every page crackles with energy. Ian's skill and pawky wit make even the most routine interview a pleasure to read...After 20 years and 17 novels, the old bastard will be missed. Rebus, that is. Rankin will no doubt go on to even greater things (Mark Sanderson DAILY MAIL)Whatever he writes, it will be worth reading. For the retirement Rebus, there will not have been bookshops opening at midnight and lines of excited readers dressed as over-weight, near-alcoholic, smoking Scottish cops but such fuss would have been justified. What his Edinburgh neighbour achieved in children's fantasy - redefining the genre and changing publishing expectations - Rankin has achieved in detective fiction (Mark Lawson THE GUARDIAN)'The first thing to say is that in the Rebus novels Rankin has not only produced the most sustained body of fiction devoted to modern Edinburgh, but has made it once again a city of the mind as Dickens made London and Chandler Los Angeles. He has changed the way people imagine the city. (Allan Massie THE SCOTSMAN)The detection in these fascinating books has always been secondary to the relationships between detectives and the portrait of Edinburgh...Perhaps our hero should stand for the Scottish Parliament (Jessica Mann LITERARY REVIEW)I can't for a moment believe this will be the last Rebus novel, but it's definitely the end of a very long chapter (Peter Gutteridge OBSERVER)Ian Rankin whose last Rebus book is as fine example of its form as you could hope for (Stuart Kelly SCOTLAND ON SUNDAY)Exit Music is up to Rankin's usual standard and it'll be a pity if it is his swansong (Vincent Banville IRISH EXAMINER)I enjoyed the retirement party Ian Rankin threw for his gloomy Inspector Rebus in Exit Music. After 17 books - this last a swirl of Tartan gangsters and dead Russian dissidents - the old warhorse was long overdue a nice sit-down and a stiff drink (Sam Leith DAILY TELEGRAPH)The 'last' Rebus is one of the best (Allan Massie THE SCOTSMAN)The gritty Scots narration intensifies the dramatic darkness and contemporary punch of Rankin's writing. (Rachel Redford)Rankin once again proves himself to be the master of British crime writing, and James Macpherson's gritty reading brings the characters to life.Rankin has given us Rebus' last case in "Exit Music", impeccably read by James MacPherson. As many twists as barley sugar and considerably less sweet.The gritty Scots narration intensifies the dramatic darkness and contemporary punch of Rankin's writing. (THE OBSERVER - Rachel Redford)Rankin has given us Rebus' last case in "Exit Music", impeccably read by James MacPherson. As many twists as barley sugar and considerably less sweet. (INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY)With no let-up in the pressure inside Rebus's head, MacPherson gives us the best performance yet and proves that one reader does not mean one monologue - each character is given their own voice which makes this dramatic. It's a rollicking good listen. (THE GUARDIAN 40 BEST AUDIOBOOKS)Glaswegian James Macpherson's reading of Ian Rankin's Edinburgh-set Rebus novels make enthralling listening. (THE TIMES - Christina Hardyment)Faultless writing, faultlessly read... Sheer aural pleasure. An audiobook masterpiece. (AUDIOBOOKSREVIEW.CO.UK)James Macpherson masterfully conjures up the various characters in this final outing for Rebus, and his accent creates just the right atmosphere. (THE GOOD BOOK GUIDE)

3.4 (7215)
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Book details

  • PDF | 400 pages
  • Ian Rankin(Author)
  • Orion; First Edition edition (6 Sept. 2007)
  • English
  • 2
  • Crime, Thrillers & Mystery

Read online or download a free book: Exit Music (A Rebus Novel)

 

Review Text

  • By Ian Paterson on 9 October 2007

    What a fantasic send off for one of the great creations of modern literature.I have read all the Rebus books in sequence over the years and fans of the series will be delighted to know Ian Rankin has written a a suitable finale.We join Rebus with one week until his retirement and in a great device the chapters count down the days no surprising the pieces don't slide together until the final day of the week.A murder of a Russian poet in Kings Stable Road gives Rebus one last case to solve soon ties are being made to big business, politicians and the criminal underworld led by Rebus' nemesis Big Ger Cafferty. Is this the last chance saloon for John to finally nail Edinburgh's gangster ?As has been the case with the last few Rankin books the reader is left guessing right until the final pages who has commited the crimes. I can say that I guessed part of it but I doubt anyone will be able to predict all the conclusions.The early books in the series were enjoyable but it's been the last half dozen that have really elevated the series the introduction of DS Siobhan Clarke I feel was where it really kicked in giving Rebus a genuine partner to bounce off. This book is no exception with the scenes with them together being the strongest. It's real shame in some ways that Rankin's decision to age Rebus in real time deprives us of further INSPECTOR Rebus books but if you haven't ever read any of the series you are so lucky to have twenty books available to you.For the rest of us here's looking forward to the first of the DI Clarke stories which if Ian Rankin decides not to write then there really will have been a crime committed.

  • By Rat Catcher on 11 March 2017

    Certainly a book that holds your interest, who did what to whom and when, butBig Ger should be either dead or alive, as this is the last book in the life of D. I. Rebus his Moriarty should one or two other,! The closure of the book comes to its end very quickly making the previously read pages almost meaningless, perhaps the same way Shiv must feel about the case, bit of an anticlimax.Will miss miss this guy so much, will start from the beginning and read his life all over again. My hero now and always will be

  • By ginger on 1 April 2017

    I already have some Ian Rankin Rebus books, so am delighted to add this one to my collection. The book was in great order although second hand. All in all a fantastic purchase.

  • By Michael Fletcher on 29 June 2017

    So this is Rebus the final novel. Well worth reading. Well written good story line. But I think he will be back as he will miss the police service. Enjoy

  • By john stevens on 11 March 2017

    Just what you would expect with a Rebus story, humour,action and a great story. I'm sure we haven't seen the last of him, I certainly hope not.

  • By Mr. William Mckain on 30 July 2017

    As always with Ian Rankin , its difficult to put down a Rebus book . Full of twists and turns and various characters that add to the plot


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